Ann B. Kim – Mixed Media Artist

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Ann B. Kim is an accomplished artist and an active member of the Dayton arts community, but I didn’t reach out to meet her until I learned she was participating in a two-person exhibition in the Dutoit Gallery this September with my friend Rebecca Sargent.

Ann’s studio is in one of Dayton’s Front Street buildings.   Continue reading

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MB Hopkins – artist

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I have seen the work of MB Hopkins for years but I only met her last February.  MB uses her art to support causes that are important to her, and in February she was at a Courthouse Square immigration event.  MB had created a beautiful art work and was giving prints to people in exchange for their contribution to the local Unitarian Fellowship for World Peace. This organization provides no-fee mental health services in several languages to refugees and immigrants.   Continue reading

Paul Henry Martin – Luthier

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About three years ago I started taking photos of people at work.  Since then I have photographed hundreds of workers – from butchers and bakers and candy makers to clowns and sculptors and fire eaters.

I have especially focused on two groups of workers.  One group is Dayton artists working in their studios, the subject of this blog.  The other group is workers in some of the region’s oldest factories.  Many of those photos have been shown in art exhibitions in Ohio and neighboring states.   Paul Henry Martin is the first person I’ve met that fits into both of these groups. Continue reading

Matt Kish – Artistic Illustrator

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I first met Matt Kish when he was being interviewed on The Art Show, a program on Dayton’s public television station.  I was there to take behind-the-scenes photos, but Matt’s story was so interesting that I found myself listening instead of shooting.

Matt had been making art for years, with little commercial success or recognition.  He finally decided he would quit making art, but only after completing one last project.  Moby-Dick had always been important to Matt, and he decided to make it the linchpin of his final art project.  He decided to make one drawing a day for 552 days, with each drawing inspired by one of the 552 pages in Moby-Dick.

Matt posted each drawing online.  They began to attract viewers, then speaking engagements, then an agent, and finally a publisher.  Far from being Matt’s final project, the Moby-Dick drawings seem like they might be a beginning to a successful art career. Continue reading